Monday, 27 September 2010

The most expensive dogs in every way

Here's a top five you really don't want your dog to be in. It's the top five most expensive breeds of dog according to Trupanion pet insurance claims  in the US.

It lists the physical cost, but imagine the emotional one, too.

Isn't it fantastic that these guys and another are sharing their data? Wouldn't it be wonderful if the UK pet insurance market did the same so that prospective owners could more accurately buy their next dog with their eyes wide open? If your preferred breed being high in the league of suffering didn't put you off at least it might encourage you to get decent pet insurance if you do go ahead?

Here's their top five for claims, wonder what the UK version would read like?:

1. English Bulldog – This breed is prone to cherry eye, brachycephalic syndrome, elongated soft palate, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, and stenotic nares. The total amount spent on this breed was $1,152,947.32, with 84% related to illnesses and 16% related to accidents. The average claim amount is $370.57.

2. Bernese Mountain Dog – This breed is prone to cataracts, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and mast cell tumors. The total amount spent on this breed was $553,660.57, with 76% associated with illnesses and 24% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $412.85.

3. Rottweiler – Health conditions associated with this breed are allergies, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and hypothyroidism. Trupanion policyholders have spent $532,261.93 on this breed, 63% for illnesses and 37% for accidents. The average claim amount is $567.53.

4. Great Dane – Common health issues for this breed are cardiomyopathy, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and hip dysplasia. The total amount spent on this breed was $462,204.97, with 77% associated with illnesses and 23% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $385.49.

5. French Bulldog – This breed is prone to allergies, brachycephalic syndrome, hip dysplasia, and stenotic nares. According to Trupanion databases, policyholders have spent $384,325.78 on this breed, with 87% associated with illnesses and 13% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $355.63.

Freedom of information seems to be all the rage in the States. Click here for another American pet insurance company sharing their claims data. Every breed in the US has a link. Isn't it great. Please UK pet insurance companies please start talking to your customers in a similar way. Check out your breed. 
Wouldn't you like to able to do the same with UK data? Wouldn't it great if the KC website was just as transparent? After all - they have the claims data from their own pet insurance. Why not share it?
 



 

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Um, shouldn't they rank by average claim instead of total claim?

Anonymous said...

what about the age of the dogs when cosidering the cost of treatment afterall if its an ongoing problem, and emergency due to accident, or treatment for a long period like cancer, these figures mean nothing they can be twisted to suit any argument

cambstreasurer said...

Surely what's needed is average lifetime spend corrected by age at death?

So, for example if lifetime spend is £5K and the dog dies aged 10, the figure for that dog would be 500 p.a.

If lifetime spend is £5K and the dog dies aged 20, the figure would be £250 p.a.

A breed average of that figure would show something meaningful about health.

Otherwise I don't see how you'd distinguish between a dog who was fit until the last few years of his life and then got treated for a lot of age related things and one who was never really well and died young.

Matron said...

Now that is a surprise! I would have thought that the penchant for the Labrador Retriever to eat everything in sight would have had it somewhere on that list! I know a vet who thinks that when God designed Labradors he should have fitted them with a zip on their tummies!

Anonymous said...

Interesting to see how much paid out, but wonder how much they were paid in the first place for such cover? was any of it covered by puppy contracts?